There are always a lot of questions about MRI vs. CT. These two imaging modalities are very different. CT is a better modality for bone and lungs. CT is great for finding small fractures and identifying pulmonary disease. CT uses x-rays to obtain images. MRI is the gold standard for imaging soft tissues, and therefore, for examining the brain and the spinal cord. Common diseases we can diagnose with MRI include disk herniations, tumors, trauma of the brain and spinal cord, strokes, malformations. MRI is also helpful in examining the skeleton, including bone, tendons, ligaments, and joints.Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI or MR) is the most advanced diagnostic imaging tool we have available to look “inside” our

pets! This safe, non-invasive procedure allows more complete viewing of the body than any other modality (x-ray, ultrasound and CT scan). This technology uses no ionizing radiation, such as x-rays. The patient is placed onto a table surrounded by a powerful magnet. Typically the magnets in veterinary medicine range from 0.2T to 1.5T. The tissues in the body respond to the magnetic field. These signals are converted to a cross-sectional image that allows us to look deep into the body for injury or disease.

We are lucky to have MRI available! It has lead to earlier and more accurate diagnosis for these and other diseases. Important advances in the knowledge of spinal cord and brain injury allows you to make more informed decisions for your pets and your families.

Pets need to be placed under anesthesia for the MRI because they need to be very still while the images are acquired (typically for about 45 minutes). Because they are under anesthesia, it is important to make sure that there are no other abnormalities that could cause problems. We often recommend blood work to evaluate their organs and x-rays to look at their heart and lungs. These tests can be done at your regular veterinarian prior to coming for the MRI. It is also important that they do not eat prior to anesthesia; we ask that you not feed them the morning of the procedure.

This is a “benign” brain tumor that can often be removed by a veterinary neurosurgeon.

This is a “benign” brain tumor that can often be removed by a veterinary neurosurgeon.

A disk extrusion causing paralysis in a dog.

A disk extrusion causing paralysis in a dog.

An MRI showing a brain tumor in a dog.

An MRI showing a brain tumor in a dog.

Signs that your pet may need an MRI

  • not walking
  • balance problems
  • walking in circles
  • blind
  • abnormal behaviors
  • seizures
  • pain

At Veterinary Neurology and Pain Management Center of New England we offer on- site 1.5 T MRI. We offer same day (out-patient) imaging for your pet. We are one of only 5 Veterinary MRI centers in Massachusetts. Our facility is unique in that it is a boutique-like atmosphere offering state-of-the-art diagnostics and treatment options.

If you have more questions about what is going on with your pet and what diagnostics may be helpful, talk to your family veterinarian or make an appointment with Dr. Kube at Veterinary Neurology and Pain Management Center of New England.